Tag Archives: Arts

ARTICLE REBLOG – Inequalities in classical music: why do they matter?

Christina Scharff

Interesting piece with a wider application, originally posted on The Sampler.

ARTICLE REBLOG – Resounding Silence: Learning to Hear the Hysteric’s Voice

Some may wonder why I reblog articles like this on Feminatronic, when it is a site about Women Electronic artists but that is precisely the point. Just as I felt that the artists I highlight were not really visible or heard, this article covers the history and underlying theories that have contributed to that perceived invisibility. It fits with the previous post about Alternative Electronic Histories and the aim to readdress the imbalances. Also, if you are interested in sound creation, the silences are also valid.

Sounding Out!

Hysterical Sound3

This week we are pleased to welcome Guest Editor Karly-Lynne Scott kick off the last Thursday Series that Sounding Out! is running in 2015. Over the last ten months, this stream has reconsidered historical figures from radio preacher Elder Michaux to folklorist Alan Lomax, found new ways to tune in the weird voices in literature from Joseph Conrad to H.P. Lovecraft, and featured unsettled soundscapes from Vancouver to Havana.

All year, our Thursday authors have been challenging sonic archives and remaking historical and contemporary problems. That trend continues with Scott’s exciting work and that of her authors in Hysterical Sound.

— Special Editor Neil Verma.

Hysteria, the infamous and now-discredited psychological disorder that was a common diagnosis for women during the 19th century, has important sonic dimensions that have often been overlooked. Indeed, sound holds a prominent place in both the symptoms and treatment of hysteria: from the…

View original post 1,227 more words

EVENT NEWS – PoL # 20 Museum of Portable Sound – Grand Opening Gala

This seems really interesting…

Points of Listening

With John Kannenberg
Date: Wednesday November 11th, 2015
Time: 18:30
Venue: London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle | meet in reception of LCC
Free with limited capacity
To reserve a place please email: s.voegelin@lcc.arts.ac.uk

mops2

The Museum of Portable Sound is dedicated to the collection, preservation, and exhibition of acoustic objects: cultural artefacts related to the history and culture of sound. With a specific focus on portability, digital initiatives, and community engagement, we bring the culture of sound to the public, one listener at a time. By eschewing a typical architectural model and operating solely as a wandering, portable museum, our institution questions the traditional museum model by leveraging its own portability towards investigating what a museum can and should sound like in the 21st century. With collections spanning the natural sciences, music, art, culture, and portable recoding technologies, our visitors are able to experience the culture of sound in…

View original post 138 more words

REVIEW REBLOG – Julia Kent ~ Asperities

I have loved the music of Julia Kent for some time and many may wonder why I would repost her here or have her on an artist page. Simply there has always been a movement in Classical music who have embraced electronic methods and processes to create an overall sound and track. This is an area that I will return to in the future and hey, what the heck – not purely electronic but beautiful.

Courtesy to A Closer Listen for the review

a closer listen

AsperitiesAsperities is as close to commercial as one can get in modern composition without compromise.  Accessible yet deep, Julia Kent‘s cello-based music provides an entry point to those who might not otherwise have considered listening to instrumental music.  Her new album offers a mix of pensive, emotional tunes and the stringed equivalent of bangers.  Credit her background in Rasputina and Antony & the Johnsons for the knowledge of how to walk the line.

Even apart from the music, Kent’s presentation exposes the workings of a complex and mature mind.  The cover seems to indicate two personalities cleaving together, or the resolution of duality.  The press release describes the album as “the layers of sound peeling back to reveal a beating, bloody human heart.”  Contrast this with the majority of releases in the genre, which bend over backwards to be polite.  As Kent puts it, “it seems like a particularly dark…

View original post 258 more words

REVIEW REBLOG – Various Artists ~ Tiny Portraits

Here is another review of the Tiny Portraits project from Flaming Pines, courtesy of A Closer Listen.

a closer listen

Tiny PortraitsThe always creative Flaming Pines label has just launched its third 3″ series, arriving on the heels of the successful Birds of a Feather and Rivers Home sets.  Tiny Portraits is a year-long series in which artists are invited to reflect on place, in particular “somewhere small, overlooked or obscure”.  It’s also a broadening of concepts first explored on Flaming Pines’ Australia-based 2013 compilation of the same name.  The first four singles (released concurrently) come from Siavash Amini (Iran), Yuco (Japan), Zenjungle (Greece) and Sound Awakener (Vietnam).  Arash Akbari’s sound map helps the listener to position the recordings in space.  Yet while the inspirations may be international, the tone is similar; these singles sound like home.

Given the theme of the last series, it’s appropriate that the new series includes the sound of birds.  Siavash Amini‘s Luminous Streams of Dawn (Doostan Boulevard, Tehran) isn’t what most people think…

View original post 460 more words

REVIEW REBLOG – A Sense of Place: Tiny Portraits on Flaming Pines

Courtesy to Stationary Travels for this review.

NATIONAL POETRY DAY 2015

Listen to the sounds…

NATIONAL POETRY DAY 2015

ARTICLE REBLOG – Ritual, Noise, and the Cut-up: The Art of Tara Transitory

I first came across the artist Tara Transitory aka One Man Nation when I put together a season on African and Asian Electronic artists, so I have been looking forward to reading this article ( also recommend the series ). Just as an aside – I posted the article on the Feminatronic Facebook page and it has had a very positive response.

Sounding Out!

Sound and AffectMarginalized bodies produce marginalized sounds to communicate things that escape language. The queer body is the site of sounds that engage pleasure, repression, rage, isolation, always somehow outside of dominant language. Sound Studies tells us that we should trust our ears as much as our eyes, justifying our trust in sound, and of the resonating body. Affect Theory goes further, saying that all senses play into a body that processes input through levels of response, experience, and anticipation. Affect is the vibrational space that is both bodily memory and anticipation. So where do sound and affect meet in queer bodies? How do marginalized peoples use sound and the body to express liberation, objectification, joy, and struggle?

Our writers in Sound and Affect tackle these questions across a spectrum of the marginalized experience.  I opened the series by offering the concept of the tremble, a sonic form of affect that is…

View original post 2,121 more words

SOUNDCLOUD SPOTLIGHT – ANGELICA CASTELLO

I previously reblogged a review of Angelica Castellos’ Sonic Blue courtesy of A Closer Listen. I came across the review again and this lead me to her Soundcloud page.

So here is todays Spotlight –

ANGELICA CASTELLO

REBLOG – EKHO: Women in Sonic Art – Ingrid Plum

Here is a great short overview about Ingrid Plum.
Courtesy to Ekho: Women in Sonic Art for this post.

:::::::::::: Ekho :::::::::::: Women in Sonic Art

Ingrid Plum is a Brighton-based Composer/Musician www.ingridplum.com

“I find that feminist context emerges as part of my practice through my eschewing of boundaries that would be projected upon my choice of roles, rather than by making work that individually and specifically addresses feminist issues… I do not usually frame my work as feminist in itself. I am a feminist who makes work and my practice infers these issues – not by addressing them directly by subject, but by making work that exists despite and in spite of any gender gap that would deny me a contextual space for my work.”

Submission to ‘Ekho:: Toward a Repetitive Sounding of Difference’

“I followed Alvin Lucier’s example in ‘I am sitting in a room’, using the piano instead of a room and Nils Frahm’s ‘Mi’ as the source…I set up 2 Neumann 183 microphones to capture the sound of a Yamaha C6 grand piano…

View original post 187 more words