Tag Archives: Arts

WEB FOCUS – Many Many Women – About

Here is a fantastic index of innovative composers, improvisers, and sonic artists which if you fulfil the criteria as an artist you can request to be added. Follow the About link –

The focus of this index is on women in experimental/avant garde music: contemporary classical/post-classic composition, free improvisation and avant jazz, electronic/ electroacoustic music, sound art, sound installations, radio art, sound poetry, etc. A few of these artists may also work within relatively mainstream forms, but they are included here because of their other work that is more challenging (example: Yoko Ono)

Source: About

REVIEW REBLOG – Various Artists ~ Pod Tune

This is a pure ambient joy and wonderful collection of tracks that I can’t fail to make my Todays Discovery, including Christina Vantzou and Mia Hsieh to name a couple of artists.
Courtesy to A Closer Listen for the review.

a closer listen

4 POD TUNE Cover ArtBefore podcasts, there were pod tunes ~ long, intricate songs flowing from underwater behemoth to underwater behemoth.  These dynamic vocalizations carried stories of other pods in other oceans.  Together, the humpback whales would learn these new songs, sometimes hours long, and share them with those they met.  Even with dwindling populations, they continue this practice to the present day.

A humpback whale’s ability to memorize music is unsurpassed, and yet each rendition is different: a nuance here, an inflection there.  It’s easy to project our emotions upon the whales, hearing plaintive cries in the drawn-out lower registers and joy in the higher tones.  Yet their true depth of meaning lies beyond us.  Whalesong provides a window into something ultimately unfathomable: the life of the earth’s largest creatures, connected by ancestry and geographic expanse.

Humans have been fascinated by whales for years, although the earliest fascinations had more to do with…

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ARTICLE REBLOG – A Conversation With Themselves: On Clayton Cubitt’s Hysterical Literature

Part two of the Sounding Out series on Hysterical Sound. This is a really interesting piece and raises important questions…read on

Sounding Out!

Hysterical Sound3Welcome to our second installment of Hysterical Sound. Last week I discussed silence and hysteria in relation to Sam Taylor-Johnson’s silent film Hysteria, suggesting that the hysteric’s vocalizations go unheard because we have tuned them out. In upcoming weeks Veronica Fitzpatrickwill explore how the soundtrack of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre can be considered hysterical in its rejection of language and meaning and John Corbett, Terri Kapsalis and Danny Thompson share an excerpt from their performance of The Hysterical Alphabet.

Today, Gordon Sullivan, considers the video art series Hysterical Literature in relation to a long history of women’s vocalizations serving as aural fetishes for the pleasure of male listeners. In doing so he troubles the dichotomies raised by the project, dichotomies between masculine visual pleasure and feminine aurality, between language and bliss.

— Guest Editor Karly-Lynne Scott

Each video in filmmaker and photographer Clayton…

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ARTICLE REBLOG – Inequalities in classical music: why do they matter?

Christina Scharff

Interesting piece with a wider application, originally posted on The Sampler.

ARTICLE REBLOG – Resounding Silence: Learning to Hear the Hysteric’s Voice

Some may wonder why I reblog articles like this on Feminatronic, when it is a site about Women Electronic artists but that is precisely the point. Just as I felt that the artists I highlight were not really visible or heard, this article covers the history and underlying theories that have contributed to that perceived invisibility. It fits with the previous post about Alternative Electronic Histories and the aim to readdress the imbalances. Also, if you are interested in sound creation, the silences are also valid.

Sounding Out!

Hysterical Sound3

This week we are pleased to welcome Guest Editor Karly-Lynne Scott kick off the last Thursday Series that Sounding Out! is running in 2015. Over the last ten months, this stream has reconsidered historical figures from radio preacher Elder Michaux to folklorist Alan Lomax, found new ways to tune in the weird voices in literature from Joseph Conrad to H.P. Lovecraft, and featured unsettled soundscapes from Vancouver to Havana.

All year, our Thursday authors have been challenging sonic archives and remaking historical and contemporary problems. That trend continues with Scott’s exciting work and that of her authors in Hysterical Sound.

— Special Editor Neil Verma.

Hysteria, the infamous and now-discredited psychological disorder that was a common diagnosis for women during the 19th century, has important sonic dimensions that have often been overlooked. Indeed, sound holds a prominent place in both the symptoms and treatment of hysteria: from the…

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EVENT NEWS – PoL # 20 Museum of Portable Sound – Grand Opening Gala

This seems really interesting…

Points of Listening

With John Kannenberg
Date: Wednesday November 11th, 2015
Time: 18:30
Venue: London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle | meet in reception of LCC
Free with limited capacity
To reserve a place please email: s.voegelin@lcc.arts.ac.uk

mops2

The Museum of Portable Sound is dedicated to the collection, preservation, and exhibition of acoustic objects: cultural artefacts related to the history and culture of sound. With a specific focus on portability, digital initiatives, and community engagement, we bring the culture of sound to the public, one listener at a time. By eschewing a typical architectural model and operating solely as a wandering, portable museum, our institution questions the traditional museum model by leveraging its own portability towards investigating what a museum can and should sound like in the 21st century. With collections spanning the natural sciences, music, art, culture, and portable recoding technologies, our visitors are able to experience the culture of sound in…

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REVIEW REBLOG – Julia Kent ~ Asperities

I have loved the music of Julia Kent for some time and many may wonder why I would repost her here or have her on an artist page. Simply there has always been a movement in Classical music who have embraced electronic methods and processes to create an overall sound and track. This is an area that I will return to in the future and hey, what the heck – not purely electronic but beautiful.

Courtesy to A Closer Listen for the review

a closer listen

AsperitiesAsperities is as close to commercial as one can get in modern composition without compromise.  Accessible yet deep, Julia Kent‘s cello-based music provides an entry point to those who might not otherwise have considered listening to instrumental music.  Her new album offers a mix of pensive, emotional tunes and the stringed equivalent of bangers.  Credit her background in Rasputina and Antony & the Johnsons for the knowledge of how to walk the line.

Even apart from the music, Kent’s presentation exposes the workings of a complex and mature mind.  The cover seems to indicate two personalities cleaving together, or the resolution of duality.  The press release describes the album as “the layers of sound peeling back to reveal a beating, bloody human heart.”  Contrast this with the majority of releases in the genre, which bend over backwards to be polite.  As Kent puts it, “it seems like a particularly dark…

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