ICYMI – Review Reblog – Flaer Smin – IRA

There is so much music!, so I’m trying to revisit some artists and releases with ICYMI.

Here’s an artist I discovered via Yeah I Know it Sucks.

Flaer Smin is from Kazakhstan and if you are a fan of expansive New Age / Chillout / Downtempo then her music is for you and can be found at Archive.org

She has a brand new release – In Search of….. https://o2label.ru/releases/07-036/

Yeah I Know It Sucks

Artist: Flaer Smin
title: IRA
ca: o2 label 05 – 06
keywords: new age,instrumental
label: o2 label https://archive.org/details/@o2label
reviewer: Willem van O.

Imagine a piano on the beach, being played by a person with the urge to sing a song that sounds a bit like ‘holy night, silent night’ in a way as if the voice was a humming violin.  It’s a tiny bit odd as you can imagine that the little waves of the sea are softly splashing against the piano and slip back against the toes of the musician that is responsible for it. Nonetheless this is a bit what the first track seems to sketch in the mind. The piano music is very nice and fits quite nicely with the little waves and the soft beach background sounds; as if it is complimenting the scenery with every note of the key.

Than the weather seems to change…

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ICYMI Review – Luna Arakawa – Ocean of tears called sky

Yeah I Know It Sucks

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Artist: Luna Arakawa
Title: Ocean of tears called sky
keywords: canadian diy experimental abstract avant-garde avantgarde brian eno canadian composer classical dark ambient experimental electronic feminism modern classical piano radiohead steve reich Toronto

Ocean of tears called sky is an emotional melodic playful work that sounds light in sound, yet feels heavy in the heart. It’s perfect to hear when in the mood for a tear, or a couple of them. Listening in the darkness with a dim light without distraction and blur your mind out in this work of melody and experimentation.

It comes seemingly in little pretty chapters with strange squeaky sounds in the middle, lifting up the mood for it not to become too heavy to carry upon the listeners’ shoulders. But when the last chapter arrives, the music gets vibrant in flow and somehow it also touches me in a emotion that sets indeed a action…

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Review Reblog – Kate Carr ~ The Story Surrounds Us

In a way, it is about restlessness, an uncomfortable tossing and turning in all these many different places, a struggle somehow to forge a connection between my own internal world and all these places and persons I have encountered. I think this holds a sense of unease and strain, with both beautiful and failed moments of intimacy and connection which are made either possible or impossible in the difficult and distorted context of being away. It is quite sad, really.Kate Carr

a closer listen

kate-carr-story-lgA strong selection of field recordings pepper the gentle songs of The Story Surrounds Us. Australian Kate Carr now lives in London, and she’s brought a fresh selection of recordings, taken during her travels around the globe, that both soothe and shock.

These recordings are scattered over and throughout the music, sometimes rolling through arid, absent spaces that lack comfort or reassurance, missing the high definition of a point A to B; cartography is absent as the lifespan of the music diminishes. This in turn opens the door – the creaking, body-aching door that opens the record, perhaps – to a subtle displacement which is not so much associated with the outer geography of the place itself but rather with a series of troubled thoughts and processes that constantly blitz the inner self; these inner lands try to find peace and rest, but it’s hard to find solace among the screeching midnight insects.

These recordings are ushered into the midst of guitar…

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Today’s Discovery – Tribute to Pauline Oliveros

Latin American electronic / electroacoustic artists tribute and creative responses to, the writings and thoughts of Pauline Oliveros.

On September 13, 1970, a young composer named Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016) published in The New York Times an article entitled “And Don’t Call Them ‘Lady’ Composers”, Ms. Oliveros addressed an unasked yet (tellingly so) critical question: “Why have there been no ‘great’ women composers?” Her argument is guided by a questioning of critical, historiographic and technical discourse. Oliveros explained how the cult of innovation constructs figures of “greatness,” and to what extent society promotes the virilisation of these discursive models…..

Read more of the background to this project, curated by Susan Campos-Fonseca here

Friday Focus – Femmecult

 

Modern perspectives in art, music and culture.

Seattle-based electronic music composer, Bardo:Basho (Kirsten Thom) did a live set exclusively for Femmecult

Interview with her on the website. http://www.femmecult.com/sound/bardob…

For more Bardo:Basho please visit her online.
https://soundcloud.com/bardobasho
https://www.facebook.com/bardobasho

 


Plum (Shona Maguire) hosts the Femmecult January 2014 podcast showcasing some of the musicians that have been influential on her work along the way.

Plum is an electro-pop producer & multi-instrumentalist who became the first female artist ever to win a Scottish Alternative Music Award, securing “Best Electronic” award in March 2013, having been heralded “One to Watch for 2013” by Best of British Unsigned in January 2013, and with her album The Seed in the ‘Best Albums of 2012’ list for many bloggers home and abroad.

Check out more of her work at her website: www.http://plumtunes.com

 

All info courtesy of Femmecult.

Reblog – on palto flats and wrwtfww’s reissue of midori takada’s seminal through the looking glass

I have loved this record for so long and over the years have visited it on many occasions. It is “a masterpiece failed by its own time”. – like so many that I could name. While other artists are feted and gain all the publicity, there are many who deserve as much accolade and praise – and finally, Midori Takada is getting the recognition she long deserved.

Although it doesn’t quite fit into the electronic field as such, please try and listen, and take in the 40 minutes that demonstrate how often gems are lost due to fashion in music, lack of distribution, knowledge and being in the wrong time and place.

It is sublime.

The Hum Blog

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Today’s Discovery – Horse Follows Darkness by Delia Gonzalez

 

“Horse Follows Darkness is essentially a modern electronic soundtrack for the Revisionist Western.” but it’s more than that, it’s a wondrous sound on the ear that has a retro feel but also firmly rooted in the now.