Reblog – The Top Ten Sounding Out! Posts of 2017!

I don’t like lists but this is an exception – thoughtful and wide ranging .

Sounding Out!

For your January reading pleasure, here are the Top Ten Posts of 2017 (according to views as of 12/28/17). Visit this brilliance today–and often!–and know more fire is coming in 2018!

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10). Unlearning Black Sound in Black Artistry: Examining the Quiet in Solange’s A Seat At the Table

Kimberly Williams

On May 18th, 2017, Solange Knowles took viewers on an expedition as she glided, danced and “agonized” in a “joyful praise break” on the floor of New York City’s Guggenheim museum. Drawing from the museum’s narrative of introspection and multi-sensory connection, Solange’s performance of “An Ode To. . .” prompted viewers to relearn and reorient the melodies of A Seat at the Table (2016). Solange’s performance in this setting hearkened listeners to new concepts and emotions in the record they didn’t catch before as they consumed it. This begs the question– what other sonic elements have we neglected to identify in A Seat…

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Article Reblog – Out of Sync: Gendered Location Sound Work in Bollywood

Sounding Out! is a definite recommend from me. It never ceases to amaze me how long term issues such as gender and class, amongst others, are covered in engaging, intelligent and interesting ways and this series is a welcome addition to their huge collection of writings, articles and ‘food for thought’.

Sounding Out!

co-edited by Praseeda Gopinath and Monika Mehta

Our listening practices are discursively constructed. In the sonic landscape of India, in particular, the way in which we listen and what we hear are often normative, produced within hegemonic discourses of gender, class, caste, region, and sexuality. . . This forum, Gendered Soundscapes of India, offers snapshots of sound at sites of trans/national production, marketing, filmic and musical texts. Complementing these posts, the accompanying photographs offer glimpses of gendered community formation, homosociality, the pervasiveness of sound technology in India, and the discordant stratified soundscapes of the city. This series opens up for us the question of other contexts in India where sound, gender, and technology might intersect, but, more broadly, it demands that we consider how sound exists differently in Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, and Afghanistan. How might we imagine a sonic framework and South Asia from these…

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Reblog – Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith Finds Her Inner “Kid” — Bandcamp Daily

 

 

The composer talks with us about music’s place in her personal ecosystem and tracing a coming to awareness with synthesizers.

via Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith Finds Her Inner “Kid” — Bandcamp Daily

Some Weekend Reading……

Pioneering Italian Women in Electronic Music

September 15, 2017
By Johann Merrich


 

maddalena fagandini

Radiophonic Ladies by Jo Hutton on Sonic Arts Network


 

Pioneering Canadian Women In Electronic Music

September 29, 2016
By Robyn Fadden


 

Early Electronic Music in Québec: A Brief History

October 4, 2016
By Roger Tellier Craig


 

Review Reblog – On the reissue of Maggi Payne’s Crystal by Aguirre — The Hum Blog

 

“For decades, Maggi Payne has quietly lingered in the realms of avant-garde and experiential music, laying influence just out of view.” 

via on the reissue of maggi payne’s crystal by aguirre — The Hum Blog

 

 

Reblog – Pioneer Spirits: New media representations of women in electronic music history

laura zattra

“Pioneer Spirits: New media representations of women in electronic music history” is a new important article by Frances Morgan in the current issue of Organised Sound, Vol. 22, Issue 2 (Alternative Histories of Electroacoustic Music) August 2017, pp. 238-249.

Teresa Rampazzi is numbered amongst those composers previously “either ignored or thought to be marginal […]. Some media representations of the female electronic musician raise concerns for feminist scholars of electronic music history. Following the work of Tara Rodgers, Sally MacArthur and others, [Frances Morgan considers] some new media representations of electronic music’s female ‘pioneers’, situate them in relation to both feminist musicology and media studies, and propose readings from digital humanities that might be used to examine and critique them”.

You can read the complete abstract here.

Frances Morgan is Deputy Editor of The Wire, former editor of plan b magazine, writes the Soundings column for Sight & Sound…

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Article Reblog – How Oakland’s Experimental Music Scene Became Queerer, Browner, and More Femme