Reblog – The Secret Life Of The Inaudible by Annea Lockwood x Christina Kubisch

Toneshift: The Future of Music Today

Gruen_180

Recorded between 2016-17 here we find two longtime experimental composers at work, and both women have pioneered new sonics at every turn over five decades. Released via the Soundscape Series (Gruenrekorder; 2xCD) New Zealander Annea Lockwood and German Christina Kubisch deliver The Secret Life Of The Inaudible. The record consists of four tracks, two from each artist, separated on the two included disks. Starting off with Wild Energy (with Bob Bielecki) Lockwood darkens the room with a earthly rumbling, maybe she’s a storm-chaser? The atmosphere is cavernous with sudden broad bass. As she conducts this muffled noise symphony tiny starry electronic blips emerge and disappear quickly. At 70-something she is still sculpting soundscapes with intuition and a greater understanding of minimalism. As the storm moves out a tiny watery ‘thwack’ grows into what sounds like distortions derived by nature. A rustling whistle plays audibly on the…

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Listening to –

 

“Lena Platonos is a Greek musician, pianist and music composer. She was one of the pioneers in the Greek electronic music scene of the 1980s, and she remains active today. Lena was born on the island of Crete and grew up in Athens. She began learning how to play the piano at the age of two and became a professional pianist before turning eighteen. Soon afterwards, she received a scholarship to study in Vienna and Berlin, where she was exposed to jazz, rock, and Middle Eastern music. She returned to Greece in the late 70’s and began working with the Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation. She released three collaborative albums between 1981 and 1983, but it was her “triptych” of solo albums, Sun Masks (1984), Gallop (1985), and Lepidoptera (1986) that would lead many to call her the “Greek Laurie Anderson” or “mother of Greek electronica”.

https://www.facebook.com/LenaPlatonos/

Reblog – Teresa Rampazzi in the last issue of Positionen n. 114 “Heroines of Sound”

laura zattra

I just uploaded the full text of my new article on teresarampazzi.it site!

Laura Zattra (2018), “Sie war ihrer Zeit voraus. Teresa Rampazzi, eine wichtige Komponistin elektronischer Musik in Italien”, Positionen. Texte zur Aktuellen Musik, n. 114 “Heroines of Sound”, pp. 9-11, ISSN: 0941-4711.

Enjoy the reading.

DOWNLOAD HERE

gruppo-nps-100-_v-gseapremiumxl The NPS Group during the first phase: 1965-1968 (Teresa Rampazzi with sunglasses).

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Reblog – on the early immersive music of joan la barbara, via mode records

Review Reblog – on pauline anna strom’s trans-millenia music, via rvng

It is a sad fact that some artists gain recognition late in their lives, sometimes due to a reappraisal of the “genre” they write. In hindsight some are realising that New Age and Melodic Instrumental music is really worth sitting down and listening to, albeit a bit late for some as in Pauline Anna Strom’s case, or too late for others. Without sounding preachy here – give things a listen, you might be pleasantly surprised.

The Hum Blog

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Review Reblog – on éliane radigue’s occam ocean vol. 1, out via shiin

Reblog – Pioneer Spirits: New media representations of women in electronic music history

laura zattra

“Pioneer Spirits: New media representations of women in electronic music history” is a new important article by Frances Morgan in the current issue of Organised Sound, Vol. 22, Issue 2 (Alternative Histories of Electroacoustic Music) August 2017, pp. 238-249.

Teresa Rampazzi is numbered amongst those composers previously “either ignored or thought to be marginal […]. Some media representations of the female electronic musician raise concerns for feminist scholars of electronic music history. Following the work of Tara Rodgers, Sally MacArthur and others, [Frances Morgan considers] some new media representations of electronic music’s female ‘pioneers’, situate them in relation to both feminist musicology and media studies, and propose readings from digital humanities that might be used to examine and critique them”.

You can read the complete abstract here.

Frances Morgan is Deputy Editor of The Wire, former editor of plan b magazine, writes the Soundings column for Sight & Sound…

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