ICYMI – Moor Mother – Fetish Bones

There is nothing to say as introduction…..Just listen.

 

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Some Weekend Reading……

Pioneering Italian Women in Electronic Music

September 15, 2017
By Johann Merrich


 

maddalena fagandini

Radiophonic Ladies by Jo Hutton on Sonic Arts Network


 

Pioneering Canadian Women In Electronic Music

September 29, 2016
By Robyn Fadden


 

Early Electronic Music in Québec: A Brief History

October 4, 2016
By Roger Tellier Craig


 

Review Reblog – On the reissue of Maggi Payne’s Crystal by Aguirre — The Hum Blog

 

“For decades, Maggi Payne has quietly lingered in the realms of avant-garde and experiential music, laying influence just out of view.” 

via on the reissue of maggi payne’s crystal by aguirre — The Hum Blog

 

 

Reblog – The Transcendent Sound of Dustin Wong and Takako Minekawa

Joyous creativity when I listen to this release : )

Bandcamp Daily

Dustin Wong Takako Minekawa Photo by Hiromi Shinada.

To speak with Dustin Wong and Takako Minekawa is to speak with one person. Part of this is because Wong does most of Minekawa’s Japanese-to-English translations—aside from the occasional interjection or giggle—but there also seems to be a high level of psychic understanding between them, a characteristic that permeates Are Euphoria, their third record as a duo.

While their first two albums—2013’s Toropical Circle and 2014’s Savage Imagination—are both strong, Are Euphoria takes the duo a step above. Perhaps it’s the three-year gap that led them to this enlightened place, or maybe there’s a new level of comfortability that didn’t exist as strongly prior to Euphoria. Either way, Wong and Minekawa have created one of the year’s best experimental albums, mixing pop sensibilities with rhythmic loops and kinetic percussion.

Soon, they’ll be bringing their tour to the U.S., showcasing these songs for an…

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Reblog – Re-orienting Sound Studies’ Aural Fixation: Christine Sun Kim’s “Subjective Loudness”

 

Recommended reading and challenging the idea that listening is just with the ear, it does demand use of all senses.

Sounding Out!

Editors’ note: As an interdisciplinary field, sound studies is unique in its scope—under its purview we find the science of acoustics, cultural representation through the auditory, and, to perhaps mis-paraphrase Donna Haraway, emergent ontologies. Not only are we able to see how sound impacts the physical world, but how that impact plays out in bodies and cultural tropes. Most importantly, we are able to imagine new ways of describing, adapting, and revising the aural into aspirant, liberatory ontologies. The essays in this series all aim to push what we know a bit, to question our own knowledges and see where we might be headed. In this series, co-edited by Airek Beauchamp and Jennifer Stoever you will find new takes on sound and embodiment, cultural expression, and what it means to hear. –AB

A stage full of opera performers stands, silent, looking eager and exhilarated, matching their expressions to the…

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Reblog – a meeting of remarkable minds, a live radio discussion between annea lockwood and pauline oliveros from december 1972

Today’s Discovery – Tribute to Pauline Oliveros

Latin American electronic / electroacoustic artists tribute and creative responses to, the writings and thoughts of Pauline Oliveros.

On September 13, 1970, a young composer named Pauline Oliveros (1932-2016) published in The New York Times an article entitled “And Don’t Call Them ‘Lady’ Composers”, Ms. Oliveros addressed an unasked yet (tellingly so) critical question: “Why have there been no ‘great’ women composers?” Her argument is guided by a questioning of critical, historiographic and technical discourse. Oliveros explained how the cult of innovation constructs figures of “greatness,” and to what extent society promotes the virilisation of these discursive models…..

Read more of the background to this project, curated by Susan Campos-Fonseca here