Tag Archives: Sounding Out

ARTICLE REBLOG – A Conversation With Themselves: On Clayton Cubitt’s Hysterical Literature

Part two of the Sounding Out series on Hysterical Sound. This is a really interesting piece and raises important questions…read on

Sounding Out!

Hysterical Sound3Welcome to our second installment of Hysterical Sound. Last week I discussed silence and hysteria in relation to Sam Taylor-Johnson’s silent film Hysteria, suggesting that the hysteric’s vocalizations go unheard because we have tuned them out. In upcoming weeks Veronica Fitzpatrickwill explore how the soundtrack of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre can be considered hysterical in its rejection of language and meaning and John Corbett, Terri Kapsalis and Danny Thompson share an excerpt from their performance of The Hysterical Alphabet.

Today, Gordon Sullivan, considers the video art series Hysterical Literature in relation to a long history of women’s vocalizations serving as aural fetishes for the pleasure of male listeners. In doing so he troubles the dichotomies raised by the project, dichotomies between masculine visual pleasure and feminine aurality, between language and bliss.

— Guest Editor Karly-Lynne Scott

Each video in filmmaker and photographer Clayton…

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ARTICLE REBLOG – Resounding Silence: Learning to Hear the Hysteric’s Voice

Some may wonder why I reblog articles like this on Feminatronic, when it is a site about Women Electronic artists but that is precisely the point. Just as I felt that the artists I highlight were not really visible or heard, this article covers the history and underlying theories that have contributed to that perceived invisibility. It fits with the previous post about Alternative Electronic Histories and the aim to readdress the imbalances. Also, if you are interested in sound creation, the silences are also valid.

Sounding Out!

Hysterical Sound3

This week we are pleased to welcome Guest Editor Karly-Lynne Scott kick off the last Thursday Series that Sounding Out! is running in 2015. Over the last ten months, this stream has reconsidered historical figures from radio preacher Elder Michaux to folklorist Alan Lomax, found new ways to tune in the weird voices in literature from Joseph Conrad to H.P. Lovecraft, and featured unsettled soundscapes from Vancouver to Havana.

All year, our Thursday authors have been challenging sonic archives and remaking historical and contemporary problems. That trend continues with Scott’s exciting work and that of her authors in Hysterical Sound.

— Special Editor Neil Verma.

Hysteria, the infamous and now-discredited psychological disorder that was a common diagnosis for women during the 19th century, has important sonic dimensions that have often been overlooked. Indeed, sound holds a prominent place in both the symptoms and treatment of hysteria: from the…

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ARTICLE REBLOG – Ritual, Noise, and the Cut-up: The Art of Tara Transitory

I first came across the artist Tara Transitory aka One Man Nation when I put together a season on African and Asian Electronic artists, so I have been looking forward to reading this article ( also recommend the series ). Just as an aside – I posted the article on the Feminatronic Facebook page and it has had a very positive response.

Sounding Out!

Sound and AffectMarginalized bodies produce marginalized sounds to communicate things that escape language. The queer body is the site of sounds that engage pleasure, repression, rage, isolation, always somehow outside of dominant language. Sound Studies tells us that we should trust our ears as much as our eyes, justifying our trust in sound, and of the resonating body. Affect Theory goes further, saying that all senses play into a body that processes input through levels of response, experience, and anticipation. Affect is the vibrational space that is both bodily memory and anticipation. So where do sound and affect meet in queer bodies? How do marginalized peoples use sound and the body to express liberation, objectification, joy, and struggle?

Our writers in Sound and Affect tackle these questions across a spectrum of the marginalized experience.  I opened the series by offering the concept of the tremble, a sonic form of affect that is…

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PODCAST / ARTICLE REBLOG – Sounding Out! Podcast #46: Ruptures in the Soundscape of Disneyland

Cynthia Wang – Her work is framed in critical cultural perspectives. In the past she has done research on how Asian American musicians use digital media to build community and collaborate, and how crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo provide new avenues of creative production and distribution for independent artists.
Check out the other podcasts via the SO! site – interesting series on sound, soundwalks and field recording with an academic but accessible remit.

Sounding Out!

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In this podcast, Cynthia Wang shares examples taken from a soundwalk she performed at Disneyland. Disneyland has been an idealized space for the middle-class white American experience, and the aural signals and music used throughout the park encourage visitors to become cultural tourists and to share in this mindset. Here Cynthia considers the moments of rupture that disturb Disney’s controlled soundscape. Join us as we listen for a pathway out of the hyper-consumerist labyrinth of Disney. And, if you would like to learn more about this soundwalk, visit it’s website here.

Cynthia Wang is currently a PhD candidate at the Annenberg School of Communication at USC, a USC Endowed Fellow, and a USC Diploma in Innovation grant recipient (for an LGBTQ stories…

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REBLOG ARTICLE – Within a Grain of Sand: Our Sonic Environment and Some of Its Shapers

Just found this article on Sounding Out and it’s a great overview of how artists have combined sound and the environment via various means to create sonic art (in its’ widest sense). Simple questions are answered by the artists focussing on what is Soundscape. Very interesting piece.

Sounding Out!

“It devolves on us now to invent a subject we might call acoustic design, an interdiscipline in which musicians, acousticians, psychologists, sociologists, and others would study the world soundscape together in order to make intelligent recommendations for its improvement.”

–R. Murray Schafer

The Soundscape, Our Sonic Environment and the Tuning of the World

With those words, and with that book, Canadian composer, writer, educator, and environmentalist R. Murray Schafer introduced the concept of the soundscape…a sound, or combination of sounds, that forms or arises from an immersive environment. What follows is an exploration of how several key field recordists define and explore the notion of soundscape.

1. What do you do?

I capture moments.

I explore environments & structures using conventional & extended field recording methods. I also use instruments & small objects. Sometimes I perform live intuitive compositions, sometimes I install work & often I compose photographic scores.

For…

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MONDAY REBLOG – World Listening Day 2015: Mendi + Keith Obadike’s “Blues Speaker [for James Baldwin]” (2015) #WLD2015

It’s Monday reblog time and here is a recent post from Sounding Out in celebration of World Listening Day 2015. I have been following the work of Mendi and Keith Obadike for some time as their art looks in detail at Race and Sound in America. I will repost the previous piece above from SO! Amplifies – recommended. Courtesy to Sounding Out for this post.

Sounding Out!

World Listening Month3For World Listening Day 2015, Sounding Out! is honored to debut Mendi + Keith Obadike’s  new documentary video about their recent large-scale urban installation at The New School’s University Center in New York City, “Blues Speaker [for James Baldwin]” (April 2015), dedicated to writer and public intellectual James Baldwin (1924-1987). –JS

As Mendi + Keith describe, “For Baldwin sound, music, and the blues in particular were sources of inspiration. The multichannel sound art work meditates on a politics of listening found at the intersection of Baldwinʼs language and the sound worlds invoked in his work. It uses the glass façade of The New School’s University Center as delivery system for the sound, turning the building itself into a speaker. The 12-hour piece is created using slow moving harmonies, melodicized language from Baldwinʼs writings, ambient recordings from the streets of Harlem, and an inventory of sounds contained in Baldwin’s story…

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SOUNDING OUT – Misophonia: Towards a Taxonomy of Annoyance

Every Monday I look forward to the Sounding Out posts as they are very thought provoking and interesting. Todays is no exception and kind of fits with the Experimental season here at Feminatronic. By the way, I am writing this listening to Yoko Onos’ ‘Cough Piece’ which has an aura about it through headphones. Courtesy to Sounding Out for the article.

Sounding Out!

chewingWorld Listening Month3This is the second post in Sounding Out!’s 4th annual July forum on listening in observation of World Listening Day on July 18th, 2015.  World Listening Day is a time to think about the impacts we have on our auditory environments and, in turn, their effects on us.  For Sounding Out! World Listening Day necessitates discussions of the politics of listening and listening, and, as Carlo Patrão shares today, an examination of sounds that disturb, annoy, and threaten our mental health and well being.   –Editor-in-Chief JS

An important factor in coming to dislike certain sounds is the extent to which they are considered meaningful. The noise of the roaring sea, for example, is not far from white radio noise (…) We still seek meaning in nature and therefore the roaring of the sea is a blissful soundTorben Sangild, The Aesthetics of Noise

When hearing bodily sounds, we often react with discomfort, irritation…

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