Tag Archives: Sound Studies

EVENT – PoL # 19 (Not a) Sound Map of Karachi

If you are interested in Sound Studies and Field Recording – This looks interesting.

Points of Listening

With Fari Bradley and Chris Weaver
Date: Wednesday October 14th, 2015
Time: 18:30
Venue: London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle | meet in reception of LCC
Free with limited capacity
To reserve a place please email: s.voegelin@lcc.arts.ac.uk

lady on bike policeman street copy

Karachi is Pakistan’s largest city, the second most populous in the world and the capital of Sindh Province. A port on the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Oman, it is a megacity of 20 million inhabitants (more than double of London). In the 1940s, American servicemen dubbed it ’The Paris of the East’ [1] and the city was the main stopover for flights and ships passing through the region. With Dubai now as the main stopover, Karachi faces environmental and structural disorder, with an estimated 500,000 street beggars and a private security industry generating ($6,000,000) six hundreds of millions of dollars in business each year.

How does Karachi’s socio-economic structure and history…

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SOUNDING OUT – Misophonia: Towards a Taxonomy of Annoyance

Every Monday I look forward to the Sounding Out posts as they are very thought provoking and interesting. Todays is no exception and kind of fits with the Experimental season here at Feminatronic. By the way, I am writing this listening to Yoko Onos’ ‘Cough Piece’ which has an aura about it through headphones. Courtesy to Sounding Out for the article.

Sounding Out!

chewingWorld Listening Month3This is the second post in Sounding Out!’s 4th annual July forum on listening in observation of World Listening Day on July 18th, 2015.  World Listening Day is a time to think about the impacts we have on our auditory environments and, in turn, their effects on us.  For Sounding Out! World Listening Day necessitates discussions of the politics of listening and listening, and, as Carlo Patrão shares today, an examination of sounds that disturb, annoy, and threaten our mental health and well being.   –Editor-in-Chief JS

An important factor in coming to dislike certain sounds is the extent to which they are considered meaningful. The noise of the roaring sea, for example, is not far from white radio noise (…) We still seek meaning in nature and therefore the roaring of the sea is a blissful soundTorben Sangild, The Aesthetics of Noise

When hearing bodily sounds, we often react with discomfort, irritation…

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On Whiteness and Sound Studies

Monday is becoming Feminatronics’ regular day to feature reblogs that get you thinking and as always Sounding Out provides some of the most thought provoking articles out there.

Sounding Out!

white noiseWorld Listening Month3This is the first post in Sounding Out!’s 4th annual July forum on listening in observation of World Listening Day on July 18th, 2015.  World Listening Day is a time to think about the impacts we have on our auditory environments and, in turn, their effects on us.  For Sounding Out! World Listening Day necessitates discussions of the politics of listening and listening as a political act, beginning this year with Gustavus Stadler’s timely provocation.  –Editor-in-Chief JS

Many amusing incidents attend the exhibition of the Edison phonograph and graphophone, especially in the South, where a negro can be frightened to death almost by a ‘talking machine.’ Western Electrician May 11, 1889, (255).

What does an ever-nearer, ever-louder police siren sound like in an urban neighborhood, depending on the listener’s racial identity? Rescue or invasion? Impending succor or potential violence? These dichotomies are perhaps overly neat, divorced as they are from context. Nonetheless…

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