Electronic Music in Britain in the 1950s and 60s: James Mooney and Monty Adkins in Conversation

So, I began with thoughts of focussing on Experimental Electronic Music and like most went down the route of the standard history that everyone charts.
As some of you by now will realise, although I do post a lot about the well known electronic artists, genres and histories, I also try to give those well under the radar a space to get their music heard or the genre a wider audience. This includes trying to bring to attention the scene in the rest of the world.
I had heard about Hugh Davies and his catalogue of ‘alternative electronic history’ but until today had not had a chance to explore further. So glad I did !
As I knew in my heart, there was and still is an alternative electronic music scene and one where many artists are quietly creating music unknown or ignored.
This is why I am reblogging this article as part of the Experimental Season, as many of the themes are still so relevant today and why Hugh Davies’ work is still vital as a challenge to the traditional historical theory.
Listening to the Soundcloud discussion is recommended as it gives an insight into roles of Daphne Oram ad Delia Derbyshire in the development of British electronic music and technology. Some interesting questions and answers.

Here is the original overview of the concert and presentation on Daphne Oram and Delia Derbyshire –

https://hughdaviesproject.wordpress.com/2015/02/19/daphne-oram-and-delia-derbyshire-electric-spring-festival-18-feb-2015/

Hugh Davies Project

In February 2015, a concert of tape music works by Delia Derbyshire and Daphne Oram was staged as part of the Electric Spring Festival at University of Huddersfield. The concert was preceded by a public conversation between the curator of the concert, Dr James Mooney, and one of the festival’s artistic directors, Prof Monty Adkins. A complete recording of this pre-concert discussion is now available via SoundCloud: click here.

10997519_10152549858486627_1645634160062896471_o

The conversation addressed the context of electronic music in Britain in the 1950s and 60s and included discussion of Hugh Davies, his self-built instruments and – in particular – his International Electronic Music Catalog. The tools and techniques of electronic music production in the 50s and 60s were discussed, as was the institutional context of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, where both Derbyshire and Oram worked.

While simultaneously extolling the challenges and contingencies of archival research, Mooney and Adkins discussed the work of some of the key figures in British electronic…

View original post 265 more words

Advertisements